Video: Jerry Sandusky Smoking Gun NBC Deleted

On November 15, 2011, NBC’s “Today” aired a video clip from an interview between Bob Costas and Jerry Sandusky.

Bob Costas and Jerry Sandusky: The Smoking Gun

During the interview, Sandusky said to Costas:

“I didn’t go around seeking out every young person for sexual needs that I’ve helped. There are many (children) I didn’t have — I hardly had any contact with.”


For whatever reason the Sandusky remark, which came off as an attempted confession, did not air during excerpted video clips from the same interview the evening before on MSNBC’s “Rock Center.” (Nov. 14, 2011.)

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Coach K: Penn St. Treatment of Paterno ‘Horrible’

In a Friday appearance on CNN’s Piers Morgan Tonight, Duke head basketball coach Mike Krzyzewski attacked Penn State’s handling of the departure of Joe Paterno as the school’s head football coach shortly after longtime PSU assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky was arrested and charged with dozens of crimes related to child sexual abuse on November 5, 2011.

Mike Krzyzewski Joe Paterno

While calling Penn State’s decision to quickly distance itself from Paterno “horrible” and a “real mistake”, Krzyzewski lauded Paterno for doing an “incredible job” at the school.


While Paterno was prevented from coaching out the 2011 season by Penn State after it was learned he had been told in 2001 of a “sexual” incident involving Sandusky and a young boy in the Penn State football showers by then-PSU graduate assistant Mike McQueary, Paterno was never fired by the school and subsequently received full pay and benefits.

Here is the full text of Krzyzewski’s comments on Penn State and Paterno during his Friday appearance on CNN:

“It was horrible, and I’ve respected coach Paterno my entire life and had a chance to get to know him really well in the last year of his life. I thought it was really not well done, in handling the situation. It’s a difficult situation to encounter.

“You had somebody who’s given six decades of service to the university and done such an incredible job. Somehow, you have to let, something has to play out and respect the fact that you’ve gone through all these experiences for six decades. It doesn’t just go out the window right at the end. I thought it was a real mistake by Penn State’s leadership.

“If that happened in my area, I would look to work with my athletic director and my president to have a solution. And if that solution meant that I would step down, I would do it in a way which would be part of the solution, not like you’re just thrown out.

“You have to understand that leadership, you may be asked to step down and that’s part of being a leader.”

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1998: ‘Mommy, Didn’t Jerry Know It Was Wrong?’

NBC News reported today that a State College-based Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology who interviewed an alleged victim of child sexual abuse by Jerry Sandusky in 1998 warned Penn State police at the time that Sandusky was a “likely pedophile.”

Jerry Sandusky Case: Alycia Chambers letter to Penn State Detective Ronald Schreffler

(See Ph.D.’s Full Report on Sandusky as “Likely Pedophile” Below)

Dr. Alycia Chambers reported the following of Sandusky to Penn State police during its investigation of the then-current Nittany Lions football coach after Sandusky was accused of inappropriate behavior with two young boys in the Penn State locker room shower in 1998:

“My consultants agree that the incidents meet all of our definitions, based on experience and education, of a likely pedophile’s pattern of building trust and gradual introduction of physical touch, within a context of a ‘loving,’ ‘special’ relationship.

“One colleague, who has contact with the Second Mile, confirms that Mr. Sandusky is reasonably intelligent and thus, could hardly have failed to understand the way his behavior would be interpreted, if known. His position at the Second Mile and his interest in abused boys would suggest that he was likely to have had knowledge with regard to child abuse and might even recognize this behavior as a typical pedophile ‘overture.’”

NBC News also reported today that the Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology ..

.. gave her report to Penn State police Officer Ronald Schreffler on May 7, 1998, along with a cover letter that highlighted “the gravity of the incidents.” Chambers had also reported the incident to the Pennsylvania “suspected child abuse” hotline, where officials wrote up their own report identifying Sandusky as the “AP” or “Alleged Perpetrator.” Jerry Lauro, an investigator who specialized in abuse cases, was assigned to work the case with Schreffler.

Penn State detective Schreffler was interviewed by PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE reporter Paula Reed Ward about the case in December 2011. In Ward’s story Shreffler claimed that the “the state (Department of Public Welfare)” was the reason he closed the Penn State Police case on Sandusky in 1998:

.. Mr. Schreffler speculates that the district attorney (Ray Gricar) declined to press charges because the state Department of Public Welfare didn’t indicate a charge of abuse, which would have made the prosecution’s case even more difficult.

It’d be a little hard for them to prosecute, when you have the state saying there wasn’t any abuse.”

But the Pennsylvania child welfare investigator assigned to the Sandusky case at the time, Jerry Lauro, told NBC News this week that Schreffler nor anyone at Penn State ever made him aware of the damning report by Dr. Chambers that profiled Sandusky as a “likely pedophile.

Penn State Detective Schreffler Closed Sandusky Case in 1998

(PSU Cop didn’t give “the state” PhD’s report on Sandusky) 

When told of the contents of Dr. Chambers’ report on Sandusky in 1998 Lauro told NBC News:

“Wow! This is the first I’ve heard of this. I had no idea . If I would have seen the report, I would certainly have done some things differently. Boy, this is a shock.”

In an interview with NBC News the mother of the alleged Sandusky victim in 1998, identified as “Victim 6″ in the Nov. 4, 2011, grand jury presentment that initially charged Sandusky with 40 counts of child sexual abuse against eight alleged victims, detailed her son’s reaction to Sandusky’s behavior:

I don’t understand, Mommy. I’m just a little kid. I knew what he did was wrong. Why didn’t he (know it was wrong)?

From what we now know, Sandusky appears to have been far from alone in that regard.

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Penn St. TV: Sandusky’s Touching Tribute To Kids

On May 24, 2006, Jerry Sandusky appeared on Penn State Public Broadcasting’s WPSU-TV to talk about the children’s charity he founded in 1977 called The Second Mile.

(2006 PSU video: “touching more and more kids” is “bottom line”)

During a 15-minute interview on WPSU’s Pennsylvania Inside and Out program Sandusky updated the programs and scope of the charity that led him to end his 35-year career as a Penn State player and coach in 2000.


Sandusky’s comments included the following:

“We’ve had a very good year fundraising and we continue to grow programs and reach out and touch more and more kids which is the bottom line and most important thing.”

“… It’s a statewide organization now. We have nine different programs, we have three offices and seven chapters around the state.

“We reach out and touch, through these nine programs, well over 100,000 children.”

The SbB-edited video includes three minutes of excerpts from Sandusky’s appearance on the Penn State Public Broadcasting Station.

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Completely Unbiased Final Judgement Of Paterno

Not many are truly qualified to pass judgement on Joe Paterno’s actions following the the Nov. 4, 2011, arrest of former longtime Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky on dozens of charges related to child sexual abuse.

Joe Paterno

Let alone those who might try to accurately characterize Paterno’s reaction to Sandusky frequenting the Penn State locker room in the nine years after Paterno was first made aware of a child rape allegation against Sandusky in the shower of a PSU football facility.

But, with the bolded text below, SbB hopes to accurately ascribe the behavior of the late Penn State football coach in the aftermath of Paterno first learning of the Sandusky child rape allegation in a Penn State football locker room in 2002.

Paterno (11/6/2011): “As coach Sandusky was retired from our coaching staff at that time, I referred the matter to university administrators.”

Paterno (1/12/2012) “I backed away and turned it over to some other people, people I thought would have a little more expertise that I did. I knew it was serious and I wanted to do something about it. And that’s why I went up the chain of command.

I laugh at those who claim that we should have blind faith in our institutions.

Paterno (1/12/2012): “I didn’t know exactly how to handle it and I was afraid to do something that might jeopardize what the University procedure was.

I chuckle at people who blame the ’system’ for their problems.

Paterno (1/12/2012): “We never had, in 61 years, until that point, 58 years I think, I had never had to deal with something like that. And I didn’t feel adequate.

It is you who make the organization work for you and you who will become victims of this system, if you fail to execute your responsibilities to yourself and to your fellow human beings.

Paterno (1/12/2011): “Obviously, he was doing something with the youngster. It was a sexual nature.

Paterno (11/6/2011): “It was obvious that the witness was distraught over what he saw, but he at no time related to me the very specific actions contained in the Grand Jury report.

We must always act but when we are wrong, we must be mature enough to realize it and act accordingly.

Paterno (1/12/2012): “When I finally got the head job, I was 16 years here before got the head job, when I finally got it I said we’re going to have the ‘grand experiment,’ and my thinking then was let’s do it the right way.”

Seduced by expediency, by selfishness, by ambition regardless of cost to principles, this spectacle will surely mark the end of the ‘grand experiment.’

We cannot morally escape our responsibility to the rest of the world.

There’s only one person qualified to provide such prescient, applicable commentary to Joe Paterno’s tragic actions the past nine years.

Read more…

Gov. Buries Paterno to Distract from Own Inaction

UPDATE: (Jan. 25, 2011, 9:21aPT): Jay Paterno Tweeted the following Wednesday morning:

To clarify: Our family looks forward to welcoming everyone to a celebration of Joe Paterno’s life tomorrow afternoon.

UPDATE (Jan. 24, 2011, 5:13p PT): The HARRISBURG PATRIOT-NEWS reports that Pennsylvania Governor Tom Corbett, who ordered all state government flags lowered to half-staff following Joe Paterno’s death, will not be attending the Thursday memorial service for Joe Paterno, “at the request of the (Paterno) family.

Gov. Tom Corbett and Joe Paterno

From a report Tuesday evening by Charles Thompson of the Patriot-News:

Corbett’s press secretary, Kevin Harley, said today the governor is “not planning” on attending the service.

Asked why, Harley said, “I am not aware that any members of the (university’s) board of trustees are attending, at the request of the family.”

Corbett, he said, wants to respect that request.

Though reporter Thompson did note that, according to sources, the Paterno family qualified the ban on PSU Trustees:

Other sources said the family was discouraging the trustees from attending as a group. That would leave the way clear for individual members with long ties to the Paternos to attend.

As noted in the original post below, Sara Ganim of the HARRISBURG PATRIOT-NEWS recently reported that Corbett voiced his feelings to the Penn State Board of Trustees at the fateful Nov. 9, 2011, meeting in which Paterno was removed from his position by school officials:

Moments before Penn State’s board of trustees voted to fire Joe Paterno, Gov. Tom Corbett uttered a final thought.

“Remember that little boy in the shower,” Corbett said via speakerphone, acting in his role on the 32-member board.

It was the last thing the board members heard before being asked if anyone objected to relieving Paterno of a coaching job he’d held for 61 years.

With that, Paterno was fired Nov. 9 in a late-night move that led to student riots in State College and boiling animosity toward the board by alumni.

What motivated Corbett to make such a strong statement in the final moment before the Board of Trustees voted to terminate Paterno after 61 years at Penn State?

Keep reading.

Current Pennslyvania Governor Tom Corbett officially learned of allegations of child sexual abuse against Jerry Sandusky in March 2009. As Attorney General of the state at the time, Corbett assigned a single state trooper to investigate the allegations - though that law officer was not authorized to bring charges against Sandusky because Corbett decided not to assign an agent from his office to directly supervise the investigation.

When Corbett became governor two years later the children’s charity Sandusky had founded in 1977, The Second Mile, had not officially been notified by Corbett or anyone in law enforcement that its founder was being investigated on multiple allegations of child rape.

Despite that apparent disconnect, the HARRISBURG PATRIOT-NEWS reported on Dec. 10, 2011, that at the same time Corbett was conducting his two-year investigation of Sandusky as Attorney General, Corbett’s gubernatorial campaign benefited financially from Sandusky’s charity:

Corbett accepted more than $25,000 from state board members of Sandusky’s charity, The Second Mile, during his gubernatorial campaign last year. On top of that, he accepted thousands more from the charity’s regional board members, according to Pennsylvania Department of State campaign contributions website.

His openness to the charity’s board members’ contributions to his campaign didn’t stop there. Corbett also allowed S&A Homes president and CEO Robert Poole, who chaired Second Mile’s board, to hold a small fundraiser for him at Poole’s home in January 2010.

Following Corbett’s election as Governor, he “re-released” a $3 million state grant to The Second Mile as part of the charity’s effort to erect a building meticulously-planned by Sandusky himself - with Poole’s company handling the construction. The release of the state funds came four months before Sandusky was arrested on dozens of child sexual abuse charges stemming from Corbett’s own investigation as then-Attorney General.

After the background of the grant was exposed to the public, Corbett pulled the state funding.

Pennsylvania Governor Tom Corbett played key role in enabling Jerry Sandusky's child rape to continue

(Corbett gave millions in state funds to Sandusky pet project in July!)

From the month he learned of the Sandusky allegations to the day he took office as Governor, Corbett’s Attorney General office issued 42 press releases touting hundreds of arrests by the Corbett-commissioned “Child Sexual Predator Unit” and “Child Exploitation Task Force.” (March, 2009 to Jan. 18, 2011.)

But Sandusky’s case was never assigned to either detail by Attorney General Corbett, even after Mike McQueary told a Pennsylvania Grand Jury of the alleged shower rape of a child by Sandusky in December, 2010, and the first-hand revelations about Sandusky showering with children from two police detectives contained in a 130-page, 1998 Penn State Police Dept. report.

Two weeks after Corbett left office as Attorney General, in late January, acting Attorney General Bill Ryan assigned four more state troopers to the Sandusky case and three agents from the state’s attorney general office, with the latter empowering investigators to bring charges against Sandusky.

10 months later, Sandusky was in handcuffs and the Penn State Board of Trustees was contemplating the fate of Joe Paterno.

Pa. Governor Tom Corbett and Joe Paterno

Of the November 9, 2011, Penn State Board of Trustees meeting that resulted in Paterno’s ouster, Sara Ganim of the HARRISBURG PATRIOT-NEWS reported it was Governor Corbett who had the last word before a vote was taken to determine the Penn State legend’s fate:

Moments before Penn State’s board of trustees voted to fire Joe Paterno, Gov. Tom Corbett uttered a final thought.

“Remember that little boy in the shower,” Corbett said via speakerphone, acting in his role on the 32-member board.

It was the last thing the board members heard before being asked if anyone objected to relieving Paterno of a coaching job he’d held for 61 years.

With that, Paterno was fired Nov. 9 in a late-night move that led to student riots in State College and boiling animosity toward the board by alumni.

Appearing on FOX News Sunday four days later, Corbett said:

“In my opinion, when you don’t follow through, when you don’t continue on to make sure actions are taken then I lose confidence in your ability to lead.

After learning of Paterno’s death on Sunday, Corbett released a statement which read, in part:

“As both man and coach, Joe Paterno confronted adversities, both past and present, with grace and forbearance.”

“Forbearance” as defined by the Merriam-Webster dictionary: “a refraining from the enforcement of something (as a debt, right, or obligation) that is due.

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Penn State: 4 Grand Jury Sandusky Investigations

A member of the Penn State Board of Trustees told the CENTRE (PA) DAILY TIMES Thursday that during an official briefing last May the Trustees were told by a Penn State lawyer that Jerry Sandusky had previously been the subject of four Grand Jury investigations.

(Same day Trustees claim tenured Spanier ‘fired’ he’s enjoying PSU facilities

Penn State Board of Trustees member Mark Dambly told the State College-area newspaper today:

“We were told in May of 2011, by Cynthia Baldwin, this was the fourth grand jury that was convened. The prior three led to no charges.”

Baldwin made the presentation to the Penn State Board of Trustees with then-Penn State President Graham Spanier, who was removed from his position by the board after the Sandusky Grand Jury presentment was released last November.

Tuesday Penn State announced that Baldwin, who has served as the University’s full-time general counsel and chief legal officer since early 2010, was stepping down. The “transition” was attributed to Baldwin having sufficiently staffed the school’s new in-house legal department.

The Daily Times also noted today that, “Penn State University spokesman Bill Mahon said he had heard there were prior grand juries.

The NEW YORK TIMES reported yesterday of the same May meeting in which Baldwin and Spanier briefed the Trustees about the Grand Jury investigation of Sandusky, with the newspaper noting that during the presentation, “No one (Trustee) asked questions.

In the same New York Times story Wednesday, multiple Penn State Trustees reported that the board fired then-PSU President Graham Spanier after the Sandusky Grand Jury presentment was released last November because he failed to keep them properly informed of the Sandusky investigation.

Current Penn State Trustee Ira Lubert, who also helped lead the school’s recent search for a new football coach in the wake of Joe Paterno’s Trustee-led ouster, told the Times yesterday:

“He (Spanier) should have told us a lot more. He should have let us know much more of the background.”

News of the latest Grand Jury investigation of Sandusky was first reported by the HARRISBURG PATRIOT-NEWS in March, two months before Baldwin and Spanier briefed the PSU Board of Trustees on the status of the investigation.

The Patriot-News reported today that by the time the Board was officially informed of the Sandusky Grand Jury investigation by Baldwin and Spanier:

Several front-page stories in The Patriot-News and on PennLive.com had described two alleged sexual assaults of young boys by Sandusky being investigated by the grand jury - at least one of which was said to have taken place in the Penn State locker room while Sandusky was a Nittany Lions coach. All of the stories were also reported in the (State College-area) Centre Daily Times and the first one was fully rewritten and put on the national news wire by the AP.

Adam Smeltz of StateCollege.com also interviewed Penn State Board of Trustees members today, several of whom did not appear in the Wednesday New York Times story that detailed claims made by the leadership of the board regarding the May briefing by Baldwin and Spanier about the the Sandusky Grand Jury investigation.

In their interview with Smeltz today, the PSU Trustees who did not appear in Wednesday’s New York Times story disputed the claim made yesterday by the PSU Board of Trustees leadership to the newspaper that Spanier had deliberately misled them about the status of the Sandusky Grand Jury investigation.

Spanier, who was photographed playing racquetball in a Penn State athletic facility on Wednesday, is now on a Penn State-paid “sabbatical” while maintaining his status as a tenured member of the Penn State faculty.

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Media Sentences Paterno To Dept Of Corrections

After co-opting the WASHINGTON POST with his own personal crisis communications manager and high-priced criminal defense lawyer last weekend, somehow Joe Paterno still ended up in the RALEIGH NEWS & OBSERVER’s department of corrections on Sunday:

Joe Paterno misidentified as Jerry Sandusky in Raleigh News & Observer

That’ll come as no surprise to Penn Staters, who haven’t been shy in decrying the injustices they claim have been perpetrated on their hero by the media in recent weeks.

Yes, we’re talking about the same Penn Staters incited to riot on worldwide television by their hero after Paterno provided the media a personal statement expressly designed to marginalize the same Penn State leadership he hid behind when called upon to stop a former longtime employee who had raped a child.

Yes, you are. Penn State.

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Video: Senator Breaks Down In Paterno’s Defense

The voice of a Pennsylvania State Senator trembled as he delivered an emotional, sometimes tearful defense of Joe Paterno at Tuesday’s Senate session in Harrisburg.


Jack Corman, an influential Pa. State Senate Republican who chairs the appropriations committee, lost his composure and was forced to pause three times before finishing a half-hour speech in which the Penn State alumnus was repeatedly overcome with emotion.

Corman’s intial remarks scolded the public for allegedly dismissing what he called the “the 60 years of his (Paterno) life’s work” after a Nov. 5, 2011, Pennsylvania Grand Jury presentment revealed that the ex-Penn State football coach failed to report directly to police allegations that former PSU assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky had sexually abused a child in the Penn State locker room in 2002.

“Today I wanted to come to the floor of the Senate and talk about one of my constituents that I thought there was a rush to judgement on. (Paterno) spent the better part of six decades building a community, building an insitution and a building a program that somehow was all lost, sixty years of his life’s work was all lost in a matter of days due to a rush to judge everyone’s actions (involved in the Sandusky case).”

Most of Corman’s comments on the floor of the Pennsylvania Senate Tuesday involved chronicling Paterno’s past accomplishments at Penn State, while the Senator also refused to conclude that the former Penn State football coach was wrong for not reporting directly to police alleged child sexual abuse by a former longtime colleague at Paterno’s then-current workplace.

Corman broke down twice in the final throes of his emotional plea to the people of Pennsylvania to not hold Paterno’s lack of action - in the face of alleged child rape - against the former coach:

“When you look at the life of Joe Paterno and what he’s meant, the biggest compliment I could say my community where I live, my alma mater where I went to school, the commonwealth which I raised my family is a better place. (pause) It’s a better place because Joe Paterno chose to live here.”

With his voice trembling, Corman closed with the following:

“He’s (Paterno) in the biggest battle of his life now but when you view his history he will win. Our prayers are with him and I can only hope my community, my institution are worthy of his efforts to make us grow.”

Corman, who represents the Penn State area in the Senate, currently serves on the Board of Directors of The Second Mile, the charity Sandusky founded to allegedly facilitate his sexual abuse of children.

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Paterno Pitched Sandusky as Head Coach in 1999

On January 12, 2011, then-Penn State Senior VP of Operations Gary Schultz testified under oath to a State College-area Grand Jury.

Joe Paterno pitched Jerry Sandusky as head football coach in 1999, proposing Penn State Altoona start a football program

(”Idea” during months between ‘98 Sandusky PSU Police report & ‘retirement’)

During the testimony by Schultz, the man who was running the day-to-day operations of Penn State at the time, he characterized what led to Jerry Sandusky’s departure from Penn State:

“I candidly have recollections that Coach Paterno and Jerry had reached a point where Coach Paterno felt it would be best that he make a coaching change.”

On Nov. 5, 2011, the same Grand Jury reported of Victim 4, one of the children Sandusky allegedly sexually abused:

The Penn State football program relocated to the Lasch Football Building in 1999 and that facility had a sauna. Victim 4 reported that after the move, most of the sexual conduct that did not occur in a hotel room occurred in the sauna, as the area is more secluded.

Victim 4 remembers Sandusky being emotionally upset after having a meeting with Joe Paterno in which Paterno told Sandusky he would not be the next head coach at Penn State and which preceded Sandusky’s retirement. Sandusky told Victim 4 not to tell anyone about the meeting. That meeting occurred in May, 1999.

While Sandusky’s “retirement” from Penn State was announced three months later, Paterno allowed Sandusky to coach the entire 1999 season.

The Grand Jury reported that it was during the 1998 and 1999 Penn State football seasons that Sandusky allegedly, repeatedly sexually abused Victim 4 - a child at the time - while representing Penn State on road trips and during overnight stays by the school’s football team at a local hotel before home games:

Victim 4 was listed, along with Sandusky’s wife, as a member of Sandusky’s family party for the 1998 Outback Bowl and the 1999 Alamo Bowl. He traveled to and from both bowl games with the football team and other Penn State staff, coaches and their families, sharing the same accommodations. Victim 4 would frequently stay overnight at Toftrees with Sandusky and the football team prior to home games; Sandusky’s wife was never present at Toftrees when Victim 4 stayed with Sandusky.

This was where the first indecent assaults of Victim 4 occurred. Victim 4 would attend the pregame banquet and sit with Sandusky at the coaches’ table. Victim 4 also accompanied Sandusky to various charity golf outings and would share a hotel room with him on those occasions.

Less than a year before Paterno told Sandusky in 1999 that, “it would be best that he make a coaching change“, Penn State law enforcement filed an exhaustive 130-page police report in which Sandusky confirmed to detectives that he had showered with two boys in the Penn State locker room. As part of the Penn State Police report, Sandusky admitted to the mother of one of the boys - in the presence of two police detectives - that his behavior “was wrong” and that “I wish I were dead.

Shortly after that report was filed and three months before Paterno reportedly told Sandusky in 1999 that, “it would be best that he make a coaching change“, Neil Rudel of the ALTOONA (PA) MIRROR reported that Paterno had recently proposed that Penn State’s Altoona branch campus start a football program.

With Sandusky as head coach.

In a Jan. 22, 1999, piece titled, “PSU Altoona Explores Football,” school CEO Allen Meadors indicated that the Sandusky-coached football program proposal was Paterno’s idea:

The idea was actually born out of a conversation with Joe Patemo. “He told me it was time for football at Altcona,” Meadors said. “I wouldn’t have even considered it if Joe wasn’t supportive of it.”

“I think it’s a good idea for the community,” Patemo said. “Eventually a lot of our branch campuses will have football, and I think more kids would be willing to stay four years, and it would help applications for admission.

“There are so many kids that really would like to play football and would like to have the Penn State name, and some of these (Division III) schools are so much more expensive than Penn State. It would be an opportunity, and there isn’t a prettier campus in the state than Altoona. The next logical step would be football”

But in a followup story by Rudel in the Mirror on April 9, 2011, then-Penn State Altoona CEO Meadors said he was initially pitched the idea by Sandusky:

“Jerry called me and asked if I would be interested in having a football team at Penn State-Altoona. I said ‘Sure, if we had a way to pay for it.’ He mentioned that he knew a gentleman who might be willing to provide the necessary funds. We visited with the gentleman, but he never committed the money, and a football-team project never got off the ground.”

In Rudel’s 1999 article, Sandusky confirmed that he had “spoken about it” with Paterno and that he would “be interested” in running the startup Penn State-affiliated program if the funds could be raised.

Sandusky has discussed the possibilities of football with Meadors several times and could conceivably envision himself becoming the head coach here.

“If it was possible (to have a program in Altoona), I’d be interested,” Sandusky said. “It would be nice. I think it’s a great idea for Penn State Altoona.”

Just three months later Paterno told Sandusky - as related by PSU VP Schultz to the State College Grand Jury - “it would be best that he make a coaching change.”

After that meeting, a Penn State Altoona football program startup was never discussed again publicly by Paterno, Sandusky or PSU Altoona officials.

At the time of the proposal, Penn State Altoona CEO Meadors told the Mirror in the original, Jan. 22, 1999, article that, “I’m concerned their (Paterno and Sandusky) scope is narrow. They’re mainly looking at Altoona, but it would have to be a much broader view than Altoona.

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