Coach K: Penn St. Treatment of Paterno ‘Horrible’

In a Friday appearance on CNN’s Piers Morgan Tonight, Duke head basketball coach Mike Krzyzewski attacked Penn State’s handling of the departure of Joe Paterno as the school’s head football coach shortly after longtime PSU assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky was arrested and charged with dozens of crimes related to child sexual abuse on November 5, 2011.

Mike Krzyzewski Joe Paterno

While calling Penn State’s decision to quickly distance itself from Paterno “horrible” and a “real mistake”, Krzyzewski lauded Paterno for doing an “incredible job” at the school.


While Paterno was prevented from coaching out the 2011 season by Penn State after it was learned he had been told in 2001 of a “sexual” incident involving Sandusky and a young boy in the Penn State football showers by then-PSU graduate assistant Mike McQueary, Paterno was never fired by the school and subsequently received full pay and benefits.

Here is the full text of Krzyzewski’s comments on Penn State and Paterno during his Friday appearance on CNN:

“It was horrible, and I’ve respected coach Paterno my entire life and had a chance to get to know him really well in the last year of his life. I thought it was really not well done, in handling the situation. It’s a difficult situation to encounter.

“You had somebody who’s given six decades of service to the university and done such an incredible job. Somehow, you have to let, something has to play out and respect the fact that you’ve gone through all these experiences for six decades. It doesn’t just go out the window right at the end. I thought it was a real mistake by Penn State’s leadership.

“If that happened in my area, I would look to work with my athletic director and my president to have a solution. And if that solution meant that I would step down, I would do it in a way which would be part of the solution, not like you’re just thrown out.

“You have to understand that leadership, you may be asked to step down and that’s part of being a leader.”

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Completely Unbiased Final Judgement Of Paterno

Not many are truly qualified to pass judgement on Joe Paterno’s actions following the the Nov. 4, 2011, arrest of former longtime Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky on dozens of charges related to child sexual abuse.

Joe Paterno

Let alone those who might try to accurately characterize Paterno’s reaction to Sandusky frequenting the Penn State locker room in the nine years after Paterno was first made aware of a child rape allegation against Sandusky in the shower of a PSU football facility.

But, with the bolded text below, SbB hopes to accurately ascribe the behavior of the late Penn State football coach in the aftermath of Paterno first learning of the Sandusky child rape allegation in a Penn State football locker room in 2002.

Paterno (11/6/2011): “As coach Sandusky was retired from our coaching staff at that time, I referred the matter to university administrators.”

Paterno (1/12/2012) “I backed away and turned it over to some other people, people I thought would have a little more expertise that I did. I knew it was serious and I wanted to do something about it. And that’s why I went up the chain of command.

I laugh at those who claim that we should have blind faith in our institutions.

Paterno (1/12/2012): “I didn’t know exactly how to handle it and I was afraid to do something that might jeopardize what the University procedure was.

I chuckle at people who blame the ’system’ for their problems.

Paterno (1/12/2012): “We never had, in 61 years, until that point, 58 years I think, I had never had to deal with something like that. And I didn’t feel adequate.

It is you who make the organization work for you and you who will become victims of this system, if you fail to execute your responsibilities to yourself and to your fellow human beings.

Paterno (1/12/2011): “Obviously, he was doing something with the youngster. It was a sexual nature.

Paterno (11/6/2011): “It was obvious that the witness was distraught over what he saw, but he at no time related to me the very specific actions contained in the Grand Jury report.

We must always act but when we are wrong, we must be mature enough to realize it and act accordingly.

Paterno (1/12/2012): “When I finally got the head job, I was 16 years here before got the head job, when I finally got it I said we’re going to have the ‘grand experiment,’ and my thinking then was let’s do it the right way.”

Seduced by expediency, by selfishness, by ambition regardless of cost to principles, this spectacle will surely mark the end of the ‘grand experiment.’

We cannot morally escape our responsibility to the rest of the world.

There’s only one person qualified to provide such prescient, applicable commentary to Joe Paterno’s tragic actions the past nine years.

Read more…

Gov. Buries Paterno to Distract from Own Inaction

UPDATE: (Jan. 25, 2011, 9:21aPT): Jay Paterno Tweeted the following Wednesday morning:

To clarify: Our family looks forward to welcoming everyone to a celebration of Joe Paterno’s life tomorrow afternoon.

UPDATE (Jan. 24, 2011, 5:13p PT): The HARRISBURG PATRIOT-NEWS reports that Pennsylvania Governor Tom Corbett, who ordered all state government flags lowered to half-staff following Joe Paterno’s death, will not be attending the Thursday memorial service for Joe Paterno, “at the request of the (Paterno) family.

Gov. Tom Corbett and Joe Paterno

From a report Tuesday evening by Charles Thompson of the Patriot-News:

Corbett’s press secretary, Kevin Harley, said today the governor is “not planning” on attending the service.

Asked why, Harley said, “I am not aware that any members of the (university’s) board of trustees are attending, at the request of the family.”

Corbett, he said, wants to respect that request.

Though reporter Thompson did note that, according to sources, the Paterno family qualified the ban on PSU Trustees:

Other sources said the family was discouraging the trustees from attending as a group. That would leave the way clear for individual members with long ties to the Paternos to attend.

As noted in the original post below, Sara Ganim of the HARRISBURG PATRIOT-NEWS recently reported that Corbett voiced his feelings to the Penn State Board of Trustees at the fateful Nov. 9, 2011, meeting in which Paterno was removed from his position by school officials:

Moments before Penn State’s board of trustees voted to fire Joe Paterno, Gov. Tom Corbett uttered a final thought.

“Remember that little boy in the shower,” Corbett said via speakerphone, acting in his role on the 32-member board.

It was the last thing the board members heard before being asked if anyone objected to relieving Paterno of a coaching job he’d held for 61 years.

With that, Paterno was fired Nov. 9 in a late-night move that led to student riots in State College and boiling animosity toward the board by alumni.

What motivated Corbett to make such a strong statement in the final moment before the Board of Trustees voted to terminate Paterno after 61 years at Penn State?

Keep reading.

Current Pennslyvania Governor Tom Corbett officially learned of allegations of child sexual abuse against Jerry Sandusky in March 2009. As Attorney General of the state at the time, Corbett assigned a single state trooper to investigate the allegations - though that law officer was not authorized to bring charges against Sandusky because Corbett decided not to assign an agent from his office to directly supervise the investigation.

When Corbett became governor two years later the children’s charity Sandusky had founded in 1977, The Second Mile, had not officially been notified by Corbett or anyone in law enforcement that its founder was being investigated on multiple allegations of child rape.

Despite that apparent disconnect, the HARRISBURG PATRIOT-NEWS reported on Dec. 10, 2011, that at the same time Corbett was conducting his two-year investigation of Sandusky as Attorney General, Corbett’s gubernatorial campaign benefited financially from Sandusky’s charity:

Corbett accepted more than $25,000 from state board members of Sandusky’s charity, The Second Mile, during his gubernatorial campaign last year. On top of that, he accepted thousands more from the charity’s regional board members, according to Pennsylvania Department of State campaign contributions website.

His openness to the charity’s board members’ contributions to his campaign didn’t stop there. Corbett also allowed S&A Homes president and CEO Robert Poole, who chaired Second Mile’s board, to hold a small fundraiser for him at Poole’s home in January 2010.

Following Corbett’s election as Governor, he “re-released” a $3 million state grant to The Second Mile as part of the charity’s effort to erect a building meticulously-planned by Sandusky himself - with Poole’s company handling the construction. The release of the state funds came four months before Sandusky was arrested on dozens of child sexual abuse charges stemming from Corbett’s own investigation as then-Attorney General.

After the background of the grant was exposed to the public, Corbett pulled the state funding.

Pennsylvania Governor Tom Corbett played key role in enabling Jerry Sandusky's child rape to continue

(Corbett gave millions in state funds to Sandusky pet project in July!)

From the month he learned of the Sandusky allegations to the day he took office as Governor, Corbett’s Attorney General office issued 42 press releases touting hundreds of arrests by the Corbett-commissioned “Child Sexual Predator Unit” and “Child Exploitation Task Force.” (March, 2009 to Jan. 18, 2011.)

But Sandusky’s case was never assigned to either detail by Attorney General Corbett, even after Mike McQueary told a Pennsylvania Grand Jury of the alleged shower rape of a child by Sandusky in December, 2010, and the first-hand revelations about Sandusky showering with children from two police detectives contained in a 130-page, 1998 Penn State Police Dept. report.

Two weeks after Corbett left office as Attorney General, in late January, acting Attorney General Bill Ryan assigned four more state troopers to the Sandusky case and three agents from the state’s attorney general office, with the latter empowering investigators to bring charges against Sandusky.

10 months later, Sandusky was in handcuffs and the Penn State Board of Trustees was contemplating the fate of Joe Paterno.

Pa. Governor Tom Corbett and Joe Paterno

Of the November 9, 2011, Penn State Board of Trustees meeting that resulted in Paterno’s ouster, Sara Ganim of the HARRISBURG PATRIOT-NEWS reported it was Governor Corbett who had the last word before a vote was taken to determine the Penn State legend’s fate:

Moments before Penn State’s board of trustees voted to fire Joe Paterno, Gov. Tom Corbett uttered a final thought.

“Remember that little boy in the shower,” Corbett said via speakerphone, acting in his role on the 32-member board.

It was the last thing the board members heard before being asked if anyone objected to relieving Paterno of a coaching job he’d held for 61 years.

With that, Paterno was fired Nov. 9 in a late-night move that led to student riots in State College and boiling animosity toward the board by alumni.

Appearing on FOX News Sunday four days later, Corbett said:

“In my opinion, when you don’t follow through, when you don’t continue on to make sure actions are taken then I lose confidence in your ability to lead.

After learning of Paterno’s death on Sunday, Corbett released a statement which read, in part:

“As both man and coach, Joe Paterno confronted adversities, both past and present, with grace and forbearance.”

“Forbearance” as defined by the Merriam-Webster dictionary: “a refraining from the enforcement of something (as a debt, right, or obligation) that is due.

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Penn State: 4 Grand Jury Sandusky Investigations

A member of the Penn State Board of Trustees told the CENTRE (PA) DAILY TIMES Thursday that during an official briefing last May the Trustees were told by a Penn State lawyer that Jerry Sandusky had previously been the subject of four Grand Jury investigations.

(Same day Trustees claim tenured Spanier ‘fired’ he’s enjoying PSU facilities

Penn State Board of Trustees member Mark Dambly told the State College-area newspaper today:

“We were told in May of 2011, by Cynthia Baldwin, this was the fourth grand jury that was convened. The prior three led to no charges.”

Baldwin made the presentation to the Penn State Board of Trustees with then-Penn State President Graham Spanier, who was removed from his position by the board after the Sandusky Grand Jury presentment was released last November.

Tuesday Penn State announced that Baldwin, who has served as the University’s full-time general counsel and chief legal officer since early 2010, was stepping down. The “transition” was attributed to Baldwin having sufficiently staffed the school’s new in-house legal department.

The Daily Times also noted today that, “Penn State University spokesman Bill Mahon said he had heard there were prior grand juries.

The NEW YORK TIMES reported yesterday of the same May meeting in which Baldwin and Spanier briefed the Trustees about the Grand Jury investigation of Sandusky, with the newspaper noting that during the presentation, “No one (Trustee) asked questions.

In the same New York Times story Wednesday, multiple Penn State Trustees reported that the board fired then-PSU President Graham Spanier after the Sandusky Grand Jury presentment was released last November because he failed to keep them properly informed of the Sandusky investigation.

Current Penn State Trustee Ira Lubert, who also helped lead the school’s recent search for a new football coach in the wake of Joe Paterno’s Trustee-led ouster, told the Times yesterday:

“He (Spanier) should have told us a lot more. He should have let us know much more of the background.”

News of the latest Grand Jury investigation of Sandusky was first reported by the HARRISBURG PATRIOT-NEWS in March, two months before Baldwin and Spanier briefed the PSU Board of Trustees on the status of the investigation.

The Patriot-News reported today that by the time the Board was officially informed of the Sandusky Grand Jury investigation by Baldwin and Spanier:

Several front-page stories in The Patriot-News and on PennLive.com had described two alleged sexual assaults of young boys by Sandusky being investigated by the grand jury - at least one of which was said to have taken place in the Penn State locker room while Sandusky was a Nittany Lions coach. All of the stories were also reported in the (State College-area) Centre Daily Times and the first one was fully rewritten and put on the national news wire by the AP.

Adam Smeltz of StateCollege.com also interviewed Penn State Board of Trustees members today, several of whom did not appear in the Wednesday New York Times story that detailed claims made by the leadership of the board regarding the May briefing by Baldwin and Spanier about the the Sandusky Grand Jury investigation.

In their interview with Smeltz today, the PSU Trustees who did not appear in Wednesday’s New York Times story disputed the claim made yesterday by the PSU Board of Trustees leadership to the newspaper that Spanier had deliberately misled them about the status of the Sandusky Grand Jury investigation.

Spanier, who was photographed playing racquetball in a Penn State athletic facility on Wednesday, is now on a Penn State-paid “sabbatical” while maintaining his status as a tenured member of the Penn State faculty.

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Media Sentences Paterno To Dept Of Corrections

After co-opting the WASHINGTON POST with his own personal crisis communications manager and high-priced criminal defense lawyer last weekend, somehow Joe Paterno still ended up in the RALEIGH NEWS & OBSERVER’s department of corrections on Sunday:

Joe Paterno misidentified as Jerry Sandusky in Raleigh News & Observer

That’ll come as no surprise to Penn Staters, who haven’t been shy in decrying the injustices they claim have been perpetrated on their hero by the media in recent weeks.

Yes, we’re talking about the same Penn Staters incited to riot on worldwide television by their hero after Paterno provided the media a personal statement expressly designed to marginalize the same Penn State leadership he hid behind when called upon to stop a former longtime employee who had raped a child.

Yes, you are. Penn State.

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Video: Senator Breaks Down In Paterno’s Defense

The voice of a Pennsylvania State Senator trembled as he delivered an emotional, sometimes tearful defense of Joe Paterno at Tuesday’s Senate session in Harrisburg.


Jack Corman, an influential Pa. State Senate Republican who chairs the appropriations committee, lost his composure and was forced to pause three times before finishing a half-hour speech in which the Penn State alumnus was repeatedly overcome with emotion.

Corman’s intial remarks scolded the public for allegedly dismissing what he called the “the 60 years of his (Paterno) life’s work” after a Nov. 5, 2011, Pennsylvania Grand Jury presentment revealed that the ex-Penn State football coach failed to report directly to police allegations that former PSU assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky had sexually abused a child in the Penn State locker room in 2002.

“Today I wanted to come to the floor of the Senate and talk about one of my constituents that I thought there was a rush to judgement on. (Paterno) spent the better part of six decades building a community, building an insitution and a building a program that somehow was all lost, sixty years of his life’s work was all lost in a matter of days due to a rush to judge everyone’s actions (involved in the Sandusky case).”

Most of Corman’s comments on the floor of the Pennsylvania Senate Tuesday involved chronicling Paterno’s past accomplishments at Penn State, while the Senator also refused to conclude that the former Penn State football coach was wrong for not reporting directly to police alleged child sexual abuse by a former longtime colleague at Paterno’s then-current workplace.

Corman broke down twice in the final throes of his emotional plea to the people of Pennsylvania to not hold Paterno’s lack of action - in the face of alleged child rape - against the former coach:

“When you look at the life of Joe Paterno and what he’s meant, the biggest compliment I could say my community where I live, my alma mater where I went to school, the commonwealth which I raised my family is a better place. (pause) It’s a better place because Joe Paterno chose to live here.”

With his voice trembling, Corman closed with the following:

“He’s (Paterno) in the biggest battle of his life now but when you view his history he will win. Our prayers are with him and I can only hope my community, my institution are worthy of his efforts to make us grow.”

Corman, who represents the Penn State area in the Senate, currently serves on the Board of Directors of The Second Mile, the charity Sandusky founded to allegedly facilitate his sexual abuse of children.

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Paterno Pitched Sandusky as Head Coach in 1999

On January 12, 2011, then-Penn State Senior VP of Operations Gary Schultz testified under oath to a State College-area Grand Jury.

Joe Paterno pitched Jerry Sandusky as head football coach in 1999, proposing Penn State Altoona start a football program

(”Idea” during months between ‘98 Sandusky PSU Police report & ‘retirement’)

During the testimony by Schultz, the man who was running the day-to-day operations of Penn State at the time, he characterized what led to Jerry Sandusky’s departure from Penn State:

“I candidly have recollections that Coach Paterno and Jerry had reached a point where Coach Paterno felt it would be best that he make a coaching change.”

On Nov. 5, 2011, the same Grand Jury reported of Victim 4, one of the children Sandusky allegedly sexually abused:

The Penn State football program relocated to the Lasch Football Building in 1999 and that facility had a sauna. Victim 4 reported that after the move, most of the sexual conduct that did not occur in a hotel room occurred in the sauna, as the area is more secluded.

Victim 4 remembers Sandusky being emotionally upset after having a meeting with Joe Paterno in which Paterno told Sandusky he would not be the next head coach at Penn State and which preceded Sandusky’s retirement. Sandusky told Victim 4 not to tell anyone about the meeting. That meeting occurred in May, 1999.

While Sandusky’s “retirement” from Penn State was announced three months later, Paterno allowed Sandusky to coach the entire 1999 season.

The Grand Jury reported that it was during the 1998 and 1999 Penn State football seasons that Sandusky allegedly, repeatedly sexually abused Victim 4 - a child at the time - while representing Penn State on road trips and during overnight stays by the school’s football team at a local hotel before home games:

Victim 4 was listed, along with Sandusky’s wife, as a member of Sandusky’s family party for the 1998 Outback Bowl and the 1999 Alamo Bowl. He traveled to and from both bowl games with the football team and other Penn State staff, coaches and their families, sharing the same accommodations. Victim 4 would frequently stay overnight at Toftrees with Sandusky and the football team prior to home games; Sandusky’s wife was never present at Toftrees when Victim 4 stayed with Sandusky.

This was where the first indecent assaults of Victim 4 occurred. Victim 4 would attend the pregame banquet and sit with Sandusky at the coaches’ table. Victim 4 also accompanied Sandusky to various charity golf outings and would share a hotel room with him on those occasions.

Less than a year before Paterno told Sandusky in 1999 that, “it would be best that he make a coaching change“, Penn State law enforcement filed an exhaustive 130-page police report in which Sandusky confirmed to detectives that he had showered with two boys in the Penn State locker room. As part of the Penn State Police report, Sandusky admitted to the mother of one of the boys - in the presence of two police detectives - that his behavior “was wrong” and that “I wish I were dead.

Shortly after that report was filed and three months before Paterno reportedly told Sandusky in 1999 that, “it would be best that he make a coaching change“, Neil Rudel of the ALTOONA (PA) MIRROR reported that Paterno had recently proposed that Penn State’s Altoona branch campus start a football program.

With Sandusky as head coach.

In a Jan. 22, 1999, piece titled, “PSU Altoona Explores Football,” school CEO Allen Meadors indicated that the Sandusky-coached football program proposal was Paterno’s idea:

The idea was actually born out of a conversation with Joe Patemo. “He told me it was time for football at Altcona,” Meadors said. “I wouldn’t have even considered it if Joe wasn’t supportive of it.”

“I think it’s a good idea for the community,” Patemo said. “Eventually a lot of our branch campuses will have football, and I think more kids would be willing to stay four years, and it would help applications for admission.

“There are so many kids that really would like to play football and would like to have the Penn State name, and some of these (Division III) schools are so much more expensive than Penn State. It would be an opportunity, and there isn’t a prettier campus in the state than Altoona. The next logical step would be football”

But in a followup story by Rudel in the Mirror on April 9, 2011, then-Penn State Altoona CEO Meadors said he was initially pitched the idea by Sandusky:

“Jerry called me and asked if I would be interested in having a football team at Penn State-Altoona. I said ‘Sure, if we had a way to pay for it.’ He mentioned that he knew a gentleman who might be willing to provide the necessary funds. We visited with the gentleman, but he never committed the money, and a football-team project never got off the ground.”

In Rudel’s 1999 article, Sandusky confirmed that he had “spoken about it” with Paterno and that he would “be interested” in running the startup Penn State-affiliated program if the funds could be raised.

Sandusky has discussed the possibilities of football with Meadors several times and could conceivably envision himself becoming the head coach here.

“If it was possible (to have a program in Altoona), I’d be interested,” Sandusky said. “It would be nice. I think it’s a great idea for Penn State Altoona.”

Just three months later Paterno told Sandusky - as related by PSU VP Schultz to the State College Grand Jury - “it would be best that he make a coaching change.”

After that meeting, a Penn State Altoona football program startup was never discussed again publicly by Paterno, Sandusky or PSU Altoona officials.

At the time of the proposal, Penn State Altoona CEO Meadors told the Mirror in the original, Jan. 22, 1999, article that, “I’m concerned their (Paterno and Sandusky) scope is narrow. They’re mainly looking at Altoona, but it would have to be a much broader view than Altoona.

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Transcript: Joe Paterno’s Grand Jury Testimony

The date is January 12th, 2011, 11:06 a.m. The questions were asked by Ms. Jonelle Eshbach, Witness, Joseph V. Paterno.

Q: Would you please introduce yourself to the Grand Jury?

Mr. Paterno: My name is Joseph V. Paterno.

Q: I’m sure everyone in the room knows, but just in case there’s anyone that doesn’t, how are you employed?

Mr. Paterno:
I’m a football coach at the Pennsylvania State University.

Q: As that football coach at the Pennsylvania State University, did you have as employed under you an individual by the name of Jerry Sandusky?

Mr. Paterno:
I did for a while, yes.

Q: Do you currently have employed for you since sometime in the early 2000s an assistant coach named Michael McQueary?

Mr. Paterno: Yes.

Q: I’d like to direct your attention to what I believe would be a spring break of 2002, around that time. Do you recall Michael McQueary calling you and asking to have a discussion with you about something that he observed?

Mr. Paterno: I’m not sure of the date, but he did call me on a Saturday morning. He said he had something that he wanted to discuss. I said, come on over to the house.

He came over to the house.

And as I said, I’m not sure what year it was, but I know it was a Saturday morning and we discussed something he had seen.

Q: Without getting into any graphic detail, what did Mr. McQueary tell you he had seen and where?

Mr. Paterno: Well, he had seen a person, an older — not an older, but a mature person who was fondling, whatever you might call it — I’m not sure what the term would be — a young boy.

Q: Did he identify who that older person was?

Mr. Paterno: Yes, a man by the name of Jerry Sandusky who had been one of our coaches, was not at the time.

Q: You’re saying that at the time this incident was reported to you, Sandusky was no longer a coach?
Mr. Paterno: No, he had retired voluntarily. I’m not sure exactly the year, but I think it was either ‘98 or ‘99.

Q: I think you used the term fondling. Is that the term that you used?

Mr. Paterno: Well, I don’t know what you would call it. Obviously, he was doing something with the youngster.

It was a sexual nature. I’m not sure exactly what it was.

I didn’t push Mike to describe exactly what it was because he was very upset. Obviously, I was in a little bit of a dilemma since Mr. Sandusky was not working for me anymore.

So I told — I didn’t go any further than that except I knew Mike was upset and I knew some kind of inappropriate action was being taken by Jerry Sandusky with a youngster.

Q: Did Mike McQueary tell you where he had seen this inappropriate conduct take place?

Mr. Paterno: In the shower.

Q: Where was the shower?

Mr. Paterno: In the Lasch Building.

Q: Is that on the campus of Penn State University?

Mr. Paterno: It’s right on the campus.

Q: Did you tell Mike McQueary at that time what you were going to do with that information that he had provided to you?

Mr. Paterno: I don’t know whether I was specific or not. I did tell Mike, Mike, you did what was right; you told me.

Even though Jerry does not work for the football staff any longer, I would refer his concerns to the right people.

Q: You recall this taking place on a Saturday morning, the conversation with Mike?

Mr. Paterno:  Yes.

Q: When did you — did you do something with that information?

Mr. Paterno: Well, I can’t be precise.

I ordinarily would have called people right away, but it was a Saturday morning and I didn’t want to interfere with their weekends.

So I don’t know whether I did it Saturday or did it early the next week.

I’m not sure when, but I did it within the week.

Q: To whom or with whom did you share the information that McQueary had given you?

Mr. Paterno: I talked to my immediate boss, our athletic director.

Q: What is that person’s name?

Mr. Paterno: Tim Curley.

Q: How did you contact Mr. Curley?

Mr. Paterno: I believe I did it by phone. As I recall, I called him and I said, hey, we got a problem, and I explained the problem to him.

Q: Was the information that you passed along substantially the same information that Mr. McQueary had given you?

Mr. Paterno: Yes.

Q: Other than the incident that Mike McQueary reported to you, do you know in any way, through rumor, direct knowledge or any other fashion, of any other inappropriate sexual conduct by Jerry Sandusky with young boys?

Mr. Paterno: I do not know of anything else that Jerry would be involved in of that nature, no. I do not know of it.

You did mention — I think you said something about a rumor. It may have been discussed in my presence, something else about somebody.

I don’t know.

I don’t remember, and I could not honestly say I heard a rumor.

Q: You indicated that your report was made directly to Tim Curley. Do you know of that report being made to anyone else that was a university official?

Mr. Paterno: No, because I figured that Tim would handle it appropriately.

I have a tremendous amount of confidence in Mr. Curley and I thought he would look into it and handle it appropriately.

Q: We have no further questions of you.

Testimony concluded at 11:13 a.m. Date, January 12, 2011, 11:20 a.m.

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Vermeil: Sandusky Misportrayed, ‘Cared’ For Kids

Super Bowl-winning coach Dick Vermeil, who in 2001 wrote the foreword to Jerry Sandusky’s “Touched” autobiography and assisted the ex-Penn State football coach with his Second Mile charity over three decades, told Kelley Bydlon of ESPN760.com this week that, “Jerry really cared about (The Second Mile children) in a different way than is being portrayed right now.”

(”I knew Jerry very well“)

Vermeil also told Bydlon, that the revelations about Sandusky’s alleged sexual abuse of children, which has thus far resulted in 52 criminal charges against the former Penn State assistant coach, “is a real downer for me. I still hold hope that it’s not all true.

On the subject of Joe Paterno’s ouster at Penn State, Vermeil this week labeled the situation to Marks-Peltz as, “Unfair. Especially for a man of his class and quality.”

When asked if Paterno did enough to help a child who in Grand Jury testimony Penn State assistant coach Mike McQueary reported under oath was anally raped by Sandusky in the Penn State locker room, Vermeil said of Paterno’s decision to not report the incident to authorities, “I would never second guess him.”

Below is the full transcript from Vermeil’s comments to Bydlon:

Kelley Bydlon: “You were involved with The Second Mile, how well did you know Jerry Sandusky?

Vermeil: “I knew Jerry very well, I didn’t know this side of him, I still want to really believe it to be true. I wrote the foreword to his book. I’ve been involved in helping him with that charity over thirty years.

It’s a real downer for me. It’s disappointing as heck.

I still hold hope that it’s not all true.

Bydlon: “When the news came out, was it complete disbelief for you?”

Vermeil: “Yes it was. I’d heard rumors there were investigations like all of us did around Second Mile, you could not. You’d have to be deaf not to hear it. But I would always give him (Sandusky) more credit for those rumors being true.

Bydlon: “How devastating was it for people involved in the charity?

Vermeil: “I know for a fact they helped a ton of kids, and I know that Jerry really cared about them in a different way than is being portrayed right now.

Bydlon: “What did you think of the way Joe Paterno was exited out of Penn State?

Vermeil: “Unfair. Especially for a man of his class and quality.  In two days he went from the epitome of what everyone should be like as a coach and I still believe he belongs in that category.

Bydlon: “In your mind did he (Paterno) did enough to stop what was happening?

Vermeil: “I wouldn’t second guess him because if he thought it was more serious than it was he would’ve reacted more seriously. I think he reacted according to what he knew, the way he felt he should.

I would never second guess him.”

Mike McQueary testified in open court in Pennsylvania today that after he witnessed Sandusky involved in an “extreme sexual” act that resembled “intercourse” with a child in the Penn State locker room in 2002, he told Paterno about the incident the next day:

“I went to his house and sat at his kitchen table and told him I saw Jerry with a young boy in the shower. That it was way over the lines and extremely sexual in nature.

“(Paterno) was slumped back in his chair, he said well I’m sorry you had to see that. It’s terrible. I need to think and tell some people about what you saw and I’ll let you know what we’ll do next.”

Also revealed in the same Harrisburg court proceeding today was the transcript of testimony Paterno previously gave a Centre County (PA) Grand Jury regarding what he was told by McQueary about Sandusky’s alleged rape of a boy in Penn State’s locker room in 2002.

During a reading of Paterno’s previously recorded comments, it was confirmed that Paterno did indeed tell the Grand Jury that McQueary related to him that the incident involving Sandusky and a child in the Penn State locker room was of a “sexual nature.

In a November 7, 2011, statement Paterno claimed:

“As my grand jury testimony stated. I was informed in 2002 by an assistant coach that he had witnessed an incident in the shower of our locker room facility. It was obvious that the witness was distraught over what he saw, but he at no time related to me the very specific actions contained in the Grand Jury report. Regardless, it was clear that the witness saw something inappropriate involving Mr. Sandusky. As Coach Sandusky was retired from our coaching staff at that time, I referred the matter to university administrators.”

As part of his 2001 contribution to Sandusky’s “Touched” autobiography, Vermeil, who was coaching the NFL’s Kansas City Chiefs at the time and in 1999 led the St. Louis Rams to a Super Bowl title, wrote of the ex-Penn State assistant coach, “He (Sandusky) could very well be the Will Rogers of the coaching profession.

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Incestuous Penn State Still Endangering Children

Four days after tales of alleged child rape perpetrated by Jerry Sandusky surfaced in a Grand Jury presentment formalizing dozens of criminal charges against the former Penn State football coach, Sara Ganim and Jan Murphy of the HARRISBURG PATRIOT-NEWS reported of a power struggle within the Penn State Board of Trustees.

Penn State Chairman of Board of Trustees Steve Garban: Son Drew was on Second Mile Board of Directors and significant donor to Jerry Sandusky's charity

(PSU BOT Chair: Son on Second Mile Board, & Specially-Recognized Donor)

Excerpt fom the Nov. 9, 2011, Patriot-News story:

Inside Old Main, the iconic Penn State administration building, a faction of the board of trustees is standing up to take control of the sex-abuse controversy engulfing the university.

That group does not include board Chairman Steve Garban, the former Penn State treasurer and vice president for finance and operations. Sources suggest a new chairman could be named soon.

Trustees lack confidence in Garban’s ability to lead the university out of this mess given his close relationships with (Tim) Curley, (Gary) Schultz and university President Graham Spanier, sources said.

Yesterday, sources indicated Spanier’s job and that of head football coach Joe Paterno were in trouble over their handling of the sex-abuse allegations. The board is creating a committee to investigate the scandal.

The trustees dislike how a few board members appeared to have been notified that charges against Curley and Schultz were imminent while the vast majority of trustees were left in the dark until Saturday.

On Saturday afternoon, shortly after Attorney General Kelly released the indictment, some board members were told they should wait until Thursday to discuss the charges. That didn’t sit well with everyone. A core group demanded, and got, an emergency meeting within 24 hours, sources say.

Twenty trustees made their way to State College for the Sunday night meeting, while others called in by phone. It was at that session that the board began to question Garban’s leadership, and a faction began to coalesce around the need to take assertive actions.

Some trustees believe the university’s handling of the matter has been bungled. Sources said the statement issued Saturday by Spanier vowing his unconditional support to Curley and Schultz caught some by surprise — and disgusted them.

Hours after the Patriot-News report about the PSU Board of Trustees’ dissatisfaction with Garban’s leadership, Paterno was fired. Before the Nov. 9, 2011, press conference announcement of Paterno’s ouster, Garban told the gathered media, “The Board has asked John to head up all Board activities on the current matters.

“John” was John Surma, Chairman & CEO of U.S. Steel and Vice Chairman of the Penn State Board of Trustees. It was Surma who then announced Paterno’s firing and took questions from a frenzied group of media and students.

But just two days after Garban ceded to Surma on “all Board activities on the current matters,” Garban himself announced on Nov. 11, 2011 - via official Penn State press release -  the creation of a “special investigation committee that would “undertake a full and complete investigation of the circumstances that gave rise to the grand jury report. The committee will be commissioned to determine what failures occurred, who is responsible and what measures are necessary to ensure that this never happens again.”

From the official PSU release:

“There will be full accountability for those found responsible,” said Steve Garban, chair of the board. “All resources will be made available for the committee to fulfill its charge and there will be no restrictions placed on its scope or activities.”

Garban said when the investigation is complete, a full report will be given to the board at one of its regular meetings.

“Trustee Frazier has agreed to chair this important committee in this endeavor,” Garban said. “He’s experienced, seasoned and will provide the leadership necessary to prevail.”

48 hours earlier, the Patriot-News had reported that its sources were suggesting, “a new chairman could be named soon.

Today, nothing has changed.

Perhaps the fact that Garban was instrumental in quickly promoting longtime Penn State administrator Rod Erickson from “acting president” to “president” - in less than 48 hours - has something to do with Garban’s unchanged status atop the Penn State Board of Trustees.

From the CENTRE (PA) DAILY TIMES on Nov. 18, 2011:

On Thursday, university spokesman Bill Mahon confirmed that Rod Erickson is the university’s new president, and there are no plans to conduct any search to fill the job.

While Erickson was named the acting president initially, Mahon said trustees soon agreed to change that to president — prior Nov. 11 trustees meeting, at which board Chairman Steve Garban introduced him as president and pledged the trustees’ support for him.

Or the fact that the media and public is apparently unaware of the intimate involvement of Garban’s son with “The Second Mile”, a charity Sandusky now appears to have set up to help him target children for sexual abuse.

For years the son of Steve Garban, Drew Garban, was an acting member of The Second Mile’s Board of Directors - right up until Sandusky’s arrest. (Garban’s name was, like many others, scrubbed from the charity’s website after details of Sandusky’s alleged sexual crimes against children were revealed.)

Drew Garban was also a longtime member of The Second Mile’s prestigious “Arthur C. and Evelyn M. Sandusky Society.” As noted in the charity’s most recent annual report located on its current website:

The Arthur C. and Evelyn M. Sandusky Society recognizes those individuals who have made an estate provision for, or a planned or deferred gift commitment to, The Second Mile. These gift commitments could include a bequest in a will or living trust, the designation of The Second Mile as the beneficiary of a retirement plan, a charitable remainder trust, the gift of a life insurance policy naming The Second Mile as beneficiary, and/or the execution of an estate note. We wish to thank the members of this society for providing a foundation for the future of our organization.

In addition to raising funds from those who wished to bequeath assets from their estate to The Second Mile, the Arthur C. and Evelyn M. Sandusky Society was set up to recognize Jerry Sandusky’s parents - who also created a charitable organization that included a boarding house for wayward youth. A house where Sandusky spent part of his youth.

Penn State Chairman of Board of Trustees Steve Garban: Son Drew was on Second Mile Board of Directors and significant donor to Jerry Sandusky's charity

In the same Centre Daily Times Nov. 18, 2011, piece that noted PSU Board Chair Steve Garban fronting the permanent hire of Rod Erickson as Penn State President, it was reported that Penn State University Trustee David Joyner had taken over as Penn State’s “acting athletic director” in place of Curley, who is now facing charges he lied to a Grand Jury when questioned about his role in reporting alleged crimes related to the sexual abuse of children by Sandusky in the Penn State locker room in 2002.

In the past two weeks, Penn State Athletic Department sources have told SbB that Joyner wants to hire interim Penn State football coach Tom Bradley as the school’s permanent football coach going forward. Bradley will reportedly interview for the position as soon as next week. (Bradley was reportedly a longtime, close friend of Sandusky and lived with Mike McQueary from 2006-07.)

Steve Garban was the leader who, as Chairman of the Penn State Board of Trustees, ultimately oversaw an environment which undeniably placed the personal desires of individual adults - and their business interests - above the welfare of children.

And despite Garban’s close relationship with all those involved with the alleged Sandusky child rape coverup, and his son’s intimate involvement in the operation of Sandusky’s charity as an acting Second Mile Board member and extraordinary financial contributor, the child-endangering environment at Penn State clearly remains alive and well.

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