If The NCAA Is Right, Cecil Lied And SEC Cheated

In the aftermath of the NCAA’s decision to clear Cam Newton to play for Auburn, we can now verify two things:

Cecil Newton Lied Or The NCAA Is Wrong

1) On November 5, 2010, Pat FordeChris Low and Mark Schlabach of ESPN.com reported the following:

When interviewed by ESPN.com Thursday at the family’s home in Atlanta, Cecil Newton, Cam’s father, denied any wrongdoing.

“If Rogers tried to solicit money from Mississippi State, he did it on his own, without our knowledge,” Cecil Newton said.

From the NCAA’s Wednesday ruling that cleared Cecil Newton’s son:

According to facts of the case agreed upon by Auburn University and the NCAA enforcement staff, the student-athlete’s father and an owner of a scouting service worked together to actively market the student-athlete as a part of a pay-for-play scenario in return for Newton’s commitment to attend college and play football. NCAA rules (Bylaw 12.3.3) do not allow individuals or entities to represent a prospective student-athlete for compensation to a school for an athletic scholarship.

Cecil Newton cannot be telling the truth if the NCAA is correct in its statement.

2)  SEC Bylaw 14.01.3.2 states:

“If at any time before or after matriculation in a member institution a student-athlete or any member of his/her family receives or agrees to receive, directly or indirectly, any aid or assistance beyond or in addition to that permitted by the Bylaws of this Conference (except such aid or assistance as such student-athlete may receive from those persons on whom the student is naturally or legally dependent for support), such student- athlete shall be ineligible for competition in any intercollegiate sport within the Conference for the remainder of his/her college career.”

The NCAA ruled Wednesday that, “According to facts of the case agreed upon by Auburn University and the NCAA enforcement staff, the student-athlete’s father and an owner of a scouting service worked together to actively market the student-athlete as a part of a pay-for-play scenario in return for Newton’s commitment to attend college and play football.”

The SEC bylaw clearly states that if a family member “agrees to receive” extra benefits from a SEC member institution, as the NCAA reported Wednesday, “such student-athlete shall be ineligible for competition in any intercollegiate sport within the Conference for the remainder of his/her college career.”

By the SEC’s own rules, Cam Newton is ineligible to play football at any school in the SEC. It doesn’t matter - according to SEC Bylaw 14.01.3.2 - that Auburn was not involved with the family member’s NCAA-confirmed impropriety.

Solicitation of funds is by definition to “agree to receive” funds, which is prohibited by the SEC bylaw.

If that wasn’t true, Newton would not have agreed to receive funds from a representative of Mississippi State if he was offered such funds.

The SEC is indisputably boxed in by its own bylaw thanks to the NCAA ruling: The NCAA says Cecil ‘actively marketed’ Cam to MSU while the SEC - by ignoring its own bylaw - implies Cecil wouldn’t have ‘agreed to receive’ any benefits from his ‘active’ marketing of Cam to MSU.

Both can’t be true. Read more…