Review: Chronicle of ESPN Secrets a Page Turner

Ever thought of trafficking in the notoriety of an exclusive group of ESPN employees whose reputations precede them?

ESPN Montage

Me neither.

Though I’m pleased to report that all the dirty little, page-turning secrets about that uncommon club of sports commentators has been unbound for you and me to discover.

Those secrets involve Chris Berman, who has been found to have tantrums at work, is confused about how sports media treats him on the internet and is notoriously creative with the ladies.

With page after page chronicling Berman’s behavior, it almost sounds like he’s the most agreeable target for ex-ESPN employees to pile on.

Then there’s Keith Olbermann, who has been accused in print of making his former ESPN colleagues miserable and ‘napalming’ his bridge from Bristol.

With page after page chronicling Olbermann’s behavior, it almost sounds like he’s the most agreeable target for all ESPN employees to pile on.

Of those brave Bristol whistle blowers, anonymous accounts by ESPN employees make for a well-worn path to Mike Tirico’s unfortunate past, which may ascribe to why Tony Kornheiser is despised by so many ESPNers, including a high profile, attention-grabbing anchor.

It also turns out that ESPN executives don’t think Bill Simmons is enough of a team player and that ESPN’s decision to give LeBron James his own hour of prime time television was marked by a cesspool of self-interest, led by the ever-likable Jim Gray.

And that a 30-year-old, high-profile media company in a male-dominated industry - that has gone through thousands of employees over the years - has had numerous female employee harassment issues.

And that a 30-year-old, high-profile media company in a male-dominated industry - that has gone through thousands of employees over the years - can experience extremely inappropriate and sometimes illegal behavior by its employees.

And that a 30-year-old, high-profile media company in a male-dominated industry - that has gone through thousands of employees over the years - is prone to having ex-employees reveal unflattering details about that company.

Finally, among the innumerable viewers of the Erin Andrews peephole video, we can now confirm that one was an ESPN employee.

Somebody should write a book about this stuff.

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