Ohio St: 326 Percent Overpayment “Not Obvious”

Today Ohio State released a statement detailing more NCAA violations involving the football program. In the NCAA-addressed report, OSU confirmed that 30-year Buckeye booster Bobby DiGeronimo, who last month was cited for paying Ohio State players at his 2011 Cleveland-based charity event, also “provided five (OSU) student-athletes wages in excess of hours worked.  While the student-athletes were provided an appropriate wage and performed the work asked of them, the then representative paid the five student-athletes in excess of the number of hours worked.

(DeVier Posey: 326 Percent Overpayment By Booster ‘Not Obvious’?)

As a result of the violations, DeVier Posey, Daniel “Boom” Herron and Marcus Hall have been declared ineligble to play football for Ohio State. While the school has applied to the NCAA for their reinstatement, it’s unclear when the players will return.In the report, Ohio State Associate Athletic Director for Compliance Doug Archie noted “the following mitigation” as it pertained to the NCAA violations by Posey, Herron and Hall:

It was not obvious to the student-athletes that they were being overpaid.  The student-athletes were not told their hourly wage.  According to the controller, no timecards were completed, as a supervisor verbally reported the hours worked to the controller, who wrote the check.  The check provided to the student-athletes did not include the number of hours worked nor the hourly wage.  As a result, while the student-athletes generally understood the number of hours they worked due to their presence at the job site, they did not know their hourly rate and would not have known if they were overpaid. 

Later in the report, Archie provided this summary of payments made from DiGeronimo - via his company Independence Excavating - to DeVier Posey:

Based on employment information provided by Independence as to the amount paid and the rate of pay, it was determined that DeVier was paid for 70 hours of work at a rate of $15.00 per hour. The NCAA Enforcement staff and institution concluded that DeVier worked a total of 21.5 hours at a rate of $15.00 per hour, and therefore was paid for 48.5 hours of work that was not performed (an over payment of $727.50).

OSU’s accounting translates to Posey being overpaid by now-disassociated OSU booster DiGeronimo by 326 percent.

In the second-to-last paragraph of his report to the NCAA on behalf of Ohio State, Archie states:

While the institution acknowledges that the student-athletes were paid by Independence for work not performed, it may not have been obvious to the student-athletes that they were being overpaid

So in less than two pages, Ohio State’s Associate Athletic Director for Compliance indicated to the NCAA:

1)  It was not obvious to the student-athletes that they were being overpaid

2) DeVier worked a total of 21.5 hours at a rate of $15.00 per hour, and therefore was paid for 48.5 hours of work that was not performed (an over payment of $727.50).

3) … it may not have been obvious to the student-athletes that they were being overpaid

Not as obvious - at least as a 326 percent overpayment - was why DiGeronimo wasn’t disassociated by Ohio State until Sept. 20, 2011.

In the OSU report to the NCAA, Archie also attached a June 29, 2011, letter from DiGeronimo to the attorney of the five Ohio State players.

In that communique DiGeronimo detailed the hours the five Ohio State student-athletes allegedly worked for Independence Excavating - hours that were subseqently found to be fraudulent and in the case of DeVier Posey, wildly overstated.

But in the Sept. 20, 2011, dissociation letter from OSU Athletic Director Gene Smith to DiGeronimo, there was no mention of any NCAA rules impropriety involving summer jobs for Buckeye football players.

Why did it take Ohio State six weeks to disassociate booster after letter detailing bogus work hours by OSU football players?

So when exactly did Ohio State find out that DiGeronimo had - according to OSU and the NCAA - exaggerated the hours worked by Buckeye football players? Today’s OSU report to the NCAA doesn’t say - this is all we get:

The institution and Enforcement Staff determined the actual number of hours worked based upon cell telephone and bank records and the student-athletes’ testimony.    

If the NCAA and Ohio State had already zeroed in on the hours worked of those five players -  so much so that DiGeronimo sent a letter to the attorney of the players detailing hours worked of that particular quintet - why the six week delay by Ohio State to disassociate DiGeronimo?

And no announcment until today?

Brooks is on Twitter, Facebook and at sportsbybrooks@gmail.com