Michigan State’s Plane Ruled Down In Madison?

Here’s multiple images from the ESPN telecast of the last play of the Wisconsin-Michigan State game on Saturday night:

Closeup photo of Michigan State goal line play against Wisconsin to end the game

(Camera Behind Goal Line)

The images are varying examples of two separate goal line camera shots shown on the ESPN telecast as Big Ten officials mulled whether MSU receiver Keith Nichol entered the end zone on the final play of regulation to give the Spartans a 37-31 victory - or not.

Closeup photo of Michigan State goal line play against Wisconsin to end the game

(Camera Behind Goal Line)

The question, obviously, isn’t whether Nichol appeared to have crossed the plane of the end zone in the goal line shots. Clearly it looks like he did in all of the images from both camera angles.

Closeup photo of Michigan State goal line play against Wisconsin to end the game

(Camera In Front Of Goal Line)

What matters is if the ESPN camera angles were linear enough to the goal line for a Big Ten replay official to cite conclusive proof in overturning the original call on the field. A call that had previously downed the ball inside the Wisconsin one-yard line and - had it stood - would’ve sent the game to overtime.

Closeup photo of Michigan State goal line play against Wisconsin to end the game

(Camera In Front Of Goal Line)

Though from these images, which include a superimposed goal line over the players involved, it’s hard to argue with the ultimate call made by Big Ten officials to overturn the ruling on the field.

Closeup photo of Michigan State goal line play against Wisconsin to end the game

(Camera In Front Of Goal Line)

But with neither camera square to the goal line, it isn’t unreasonable to think that perhaps Big Ten officials wouldn’t have had the stomach to overturn the original call on the field had the game been in Madison instead of East Lansing.

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