Mark Ingram Seems To Think Prison Is Optional

Former NFL wide receiver Mark Ingram had a pretty successful professional football career. In 10 seasons playing for the New York Giants, Miami Dolphins, Green Bay Packers, and Philadelphia Eagles, Ingram caught 265 passes for 3,926 yards and 26 touchdowns. The biggest achievement of his career was probably helping the Giants win Super Bowl XXV against the Buffalo Bills. Still, despite Mark’s pretty solid NFL career, football was never really his passion. No, what Mark really cares about is breaking the law.

Back in 2001, Mark was sentenced to six months in prison after getting caught with $3,290 in counterfeit cash, and followed that achievement up with a 1-year sentence after stealing a credit card from a golf course in Michigan back in 2004. Then in August 2007, there was an arrest warrant issued for Ingram after he allegedly broke into a building and stole a purse containing cash and credit cards. Of course, Mark’s greatest accomplishment was the 92-month sentence he received for bank fraud and money laundering in September of this year.

He was supposed to start serving that sentence in Kentucky yesterday, but there was one small problem - Ingram never showed up to prison.

From NEWSDAY.COM:

Federal marshals are searching for Mark Ingram, a one-time Super Bowl star as wide receiver for the New York Giants, who failed to show up Friday to begin a 7-year, 8-month sentence at a federal prison in Kentucky.

Ingram had not shown up for sentencing several times at federal court in Central Islip, after his conviction for attempting to launder $100,000 for people he thought were Uniondale drug dealers. Ingram was caught in an FBI sting operation.

Apparently not showing up for something is nothing new to Ingram.  He repeatedly failed to show up to sentencing dates since being found guilty in September, and the Judge kept delaying the sentencing each time. It also prompted the federal prosecutor in the case, Richard Donaghue, to say that maybe Ingram felt court dates were “optional.”

Thankfully Mark’s son Mark Ingram Jr. plays wide receiver at the University of Alabama and has a chance to carry on the family tradition while his father is locked away.